• Maxwell Collins

2020 Presidential Election- What Does it Mean for Minorities?

Donald Trump has yet to concede as president. Election night was over 3 weeks ago. In the past, the losing candidate concedes relatively immediately as courtesy, although this is not a requirement.


Historically, the transition of power is the process between the current president and the president elect. President elect prepares to take over the administration and the current president aids in this, ensuring a peaceful transition.


The concession speech and call to the winning candidate is something that is done out of custom and courtesy, but the losing candidate is not required to concede,” said Shelley Yoder, another MHS government teacher.

Commonly, a new president would be given a transition team, funding, office spaces, security clearance to view sensitive information, and allowed to choose his staff- as soon as the projected winner was announced. As of November 24th evening, Trump has agreed to give Biden access to these resources but has yet to concede as president.


With Michigan voting 3-1 to certify Biden as the winner of the state's XX electoral college votes, Biden has earned 307 electoral college votes and a clear victory in the 2020 election.


“It is important to note that the elections in several of the States have not been certified as of today and litigation is pending. The electoral college doesn't meet to vote until Dec. 14, that is when the president will be elected,” stated Nathan Blair, MHS government teacher.


When Biden was announced as the projected winner, Trump sent out the following tweet: "Tens of thousands of votes were illegally received after 8 P.M. on Tuesday, Election Day,” followed up by saying "totally and easily changing the results in Pennsylvania and certain other razor thin states.”


The tweet was very quickly marked as false information but Trump stands by his statement.


Trump has sued multiple states for “manipulating the ballots”, but most cases were thrown out for lack of evidence by judges. Regardless, there are many states that are recounting, and others that are still counting original ballots.


Assuming the official outcome of the 2020 election does not change, what does it mean for minorities? The rights of POC (people of color), LGBT, women and muslims are often up for debate during the election processes, and the candidates often laid out plans- informing Americans what they plan on doing to help these minority groups.



“In reality It will make no difference,” Blair explained, “Under President Trump minority unemployment was at an all time low. Trump fully funded historically black colleges for 10 years, unlike prior administrations.”


In 2019, Trump signed a bill that will permanently provide (historically) black colleges with $250 every year. Additionally, a new record low of unemployment in black communities was charted in October/November of 2019, at a low of 5.1%- whereas before Trump’s administration black unemployment rates averaged around 14.8% in 2010.


Biden has been very vocal about his plans for minority groups, even having many areas on his website (found here) addressing specific minority groups.



“Joe Biden believes that every human being should be treated with respect and dignity and be able to live without fear no matter who they are or who they love,” as stated on the official Joe Biden website.


As listed on Biden’s website, his plan for Black and Brown communities is to make a stronger, resilient, and inclusive economy. To do this- here are some specific plans he wants to introduce:


  • Reform opportunity zones to fulfill their promise

  • Make a historic commitment to equalizing federal procurement

  • Ensure workers of color are compensated fairly

  • Strengthen the federal reserve’s focus on racial economic gaps


The following are some points listed on Donald Trump’s official website (found here)


  • Access to better education and job training opportunities

  • An immigration policy that protects American jobs

  • Proposed 3 million new jobs for the black community


“I don't think Joe Biden can improve President Trump's record on policy towards minority groups. The narrative will probably be different,” Blair answered.


Yoder mentioned, “One thing to remember about plans that are put out by campaign websites: many politicians promise things that they either can’t or don’t follow through with. Campaign promises are more like proposals.”


On Biden’s website “Hate and discrimination against LGBTQ+ people started long before Trump and Pence took office. Defeating them will not solve the problem, but it is an essential first step in order to resume our march toward equality.


But some say that actions speak louder than words. What do Trump's actions as president look like compared to his proposed plans? As an example, take a look at the president and president elect’s support for the LGBT community. In his time in office Trump speaks little about LGBT but has said he supports the community. Meanwhile, he has banned transgender people from serving in the military.


“Our military must be focused on decisive and overwhelming … victory and cannot be burdened with the tremendous medical costs and disruption that transgender in the military would entail.”


President elect Biden also states that he supports the LGBT community and even has his plans for the group publicly listed on his website (found here). But in the past, Biden has supported many anti-LGBT bills and acts such as the “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” and voted in favour of schools not teaching about homosexuality as a lifestyle.


Both candidates have rocky pasts with LGBT rights, but as it grew more accepted many people in the community hope to see change and many hope for new, more accepting laws with this new term.


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